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As mobile usage becomes more prevalent, so does the need to protect your work or school data on those devices. One method used to protect that data is through device enrollment. Device enrollment enables organizations to deploy compliance policies (PIN strength, /root validation, etc.), as well as configuration policies (WIFI, certificates, VPN, etc.). Device enrollment also enables organizations to manage app lifecycle.

 

With Android 5.0, Google introduced a new management profile with the introduction of managed device (device owner) and work profile (profile owner) modes (what is collectively known as Android Enterprise now).

 

Android Enterprise supports several enrollment scenarios, two of which are covered as part of this framework:

  • Android Enterprise work profile – this enrollment model is typically used for personally-owned devices, where IT wants to provide a clear separation boundary between work and personal data. Policies controlled by IT ensure that the work data cannot be transferred into the personal profile.
  • Android Enterprise fully managed devices – these devices are corporate-owned, associated with a single user, and used exclusively for work and not personal use.

When configuring device compliance and configuration policies, the number of various settings and options enable organizations to tailor the protection to their specific needs. Due to this flexibility, it may not be obvious which permutation of policy settings are required to implement a complete scenario. To help organizations prioritize client endpoint hardening, Microsoft has introduced a new taxonomy for security configurations in Windows 10, and Intune is leveraging a similar taxonomy for its Android Enterprise security configuration framework.

 

The Android Enterprise security configuration framework is organized into several distinct configuration scenarios, providing guidance for work profile and fully managed scenarios.

 

For Android Enterprise work profile devices:

  • Work profile basic security (Level 1) – Microsoft recommends this configuration as the minimum security configuration for personal devices where users access work or school data. This configuration introduces password requirements, separates work and personal data, and validates Android device attestation.
  • Work profile high security (Level 3) – Microsoft recommends this configuration for devices used by specific users or groups who are uniquely high risk (users who handle highly sensitive data where unauthorized disclosure causes considerable material loss to the organization). This configuration introduces mobile threat defense or Microsoft Defender ATP, sets the minimum Android version to 8.0, enacts stronger password policies, and further restricts work and personal separation.

Note: Due to the settings available in Android Enterprise work profile, there is no enhanced security (Level 2) offering. The available settings did not justify a difference between Level 1 and Level 2 and there is a need to maintain consistency with the configuration framework nomenclature across platforms.

 

For Android Enterprise fully managed devices:

  • Fully managed basic security (Level 1) – Microsoft recommends this configuration as the minimum security configuration for an enterprise device. This configuration is applicable to most mobile users accessing work or school data. This configuration introduces password requirements, sets the minimum Android version to 8.0, and enacts certain device restrictions.
  • Fully managed enhanced security (Level 2) – Microsoft recommends this configuration for devices where users access sensitive or confidential information. This configuration enacts stronger password policies and disables user/account capabilities.
  • Fully managed high security (Level 3) – Microsoft recommends this configuration for devices used by specific users or groups who are uniquely high risk (users who handle highly sensitive data where unauthorized disclosure causes considerable material loss to the organization). This configuration increases the minimum Android version to 10.0, introduces mobile threat defense or Microsoft Defender ATP, and enforces additional device restrictions.

Note: The framework is designed with the understanding that organizations own the Android Enterprise fully managed devices.

 

To see the specific recommendations for each configuration level, review Android Enterprise Security Configuration Framework

 

As with any framework, settings within a corresponding level may need to be adjusted based on the needs of the organization as security must evaluate the threat environment, risk appetite, and impact to usability. 

 

We hope this framework helps you when evaluating what Android Enterprise settings to deploy in your environment, or if you are transitioning away from Android device administrator. As always, if you have questions, please let us know. 

 

Ross Smith IV
Principal Program Manager
Customer Experience Engineering

Brought to you by Dr. Ware, Microsoft Office 365 Silver Partner, Charleston SC.

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