Conned on social media? It’s not just you

Conned on social media? It’s not just you

This article was originally posted by the FTC. See the original article here.

In 2021, more than 95,000 people told the FTC that they’d been scammed with a con that started on social media. In fact, more than one in four people who reported to the FTC that they lost money to any scam said the transaction started with a post, an ad, or a message on a social media platform. And the losses amount to about $770 million.
Today’s Data Spotlight gives us insights into how scammers use social media to con people. Reports point to rampant investment, romance, and online shopping scams on social. People reported losing the most money to investment scams (particularly those involving bogus cryptocurrency investments) and romance scams. More than a third of the people who lost money to romance scams said it started on Facebook or Instagram.

The largest number of reports came from people who lost money trying to buy something they saw marketed on social media. Most said they didn’t get the stuff they paid for, while some reported ads that impersonated a real online retailer. Reports of social media fraud increased for all age groups in 2021, but people 18 to 39 were more than twice as likely to report losing money than older adults.

Scammers trying to get your money are always looking for new ways to reach people. And they’ll use whatever they know about you to target their pitch. Here are some things to do to protect yourself, no matter which social media platform you use:

  • Try to limit who can see your posts and information on social media. Of course, all platforms collect information about you from your activities on social media, but visit your privacy settings to set some restrictions.
  • Check if you can opt out of targeted advertising. Some platforms let you do that.
  • If you see urgent messages from a “friend” asking for money, stop. It could be a hacker behind that post pretending to be your friend.
  • Check out a company before you buy. Read Shopping Online for advice.
  • Don’t deal with a vendor that requires payment by cryptocurrency, gift card, or wire transfer. That’s sure to be a scam.

Brought to you by Dr. Ware, Microsoft Office 365 Silver Partner, Charleston SC.

FBI Releases PIN on Iranian Cyber Group Emennet Pasargad

FBI Releases PIN on Iranian Cyber Group Emennet Pasargad

This article is contributed. See the original author and article here.

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Online retailer, Fashion Nova, gets a dressing down for hiding negative reviews

Online retailer, Fashion Nova, gets a dressing down for hiding negative reviews

This article was originally posted by the FTC. See the original article here.

Shopping for clothes online can be fun and convenient, but it lacks the in-person experience of trying them on, touching the fabrics, and checking for quality. That’s why so many online shoppers turn to honest customer reviews for help. But when an online retailer cherry picks only the positive reviews for posting, the result is anything but honest.

If a company suggests that the reviews on its website reflect the views of all buyers who submitted reviews, it’s against the law for the company to NOT post negative reviews. According to the FTC [link to press release], online retailer Fashion Nova did just that. The FTC says that Fashion Nova broke the law when it failed to post hundreds of thousands of negative reviews that people submitted.

What does this mean for you and other online fashionistas? Well, for one thing, Fashion Nova must not make any further misrepresentations about customer reviews or other endorsements.

Here are some things to consider the next time you’re using online reviews to buy clothing or anything else:

  • Think about the source of the reviews you’re reading. What do you know about the reviewers or the site they’ve posted on that makes them trustworthy?
  • Compare reviews from a variety of well-known sources, not just the seller’s site.
  • Start with websites recognized for having credible and impartial expert reviews.

For more information, see Online Shopping and How To Evaluate Online Reviews.

Brought to you by Dr. Ware, Microsoft Office 365 Silver Partner, Charleston SC.

An early-bird special for Identity Theft Awareness Week

An early-bird special for Identity Theft Awareness Week

This article was originally posted by the FTC. See the original article here.

Identity Theft Awareness Week starts next Monday but if you’re an early bird, check out a special free webinar tomorrow and get a jump on the week’s events.

Experts from the Department of Veterans Affairs, United States Postal Inspection Service, and Federal Trade Commission will discuss privacy and identity theft issues important to all of us, and also issues that directly impact veterans and their families. The virtual panel discussion, Evolving Identity Theft Tactics & Protections, is set for Tuesday, January 25, at 1-2 p.m. ET. Join us using this link.

We hope you’ll also join us for Identity Theft Awareness Week, January 31-Februray 4, as the FTC and its partners host free webinars, podcasts, and other events. You’ll learn how to detect identity theft, help protect against it, and recover if identity theft occurs. And every day next week you’ll find a blog post here, covering a trending identity theft topic.

Identity theft can happen to anyone — but tell your friends and family that, next week, they can join the FTC and its partners to spot, avoid, and protect themselves. And if identity theft happens to you, please visit IdentityTheft.gov, the government’s one-stop resource for reporting and recovering from identity theft.

We hope to see you during Identity Theft Awareness Week to share information about how identity thieves operate, and how to lower your risk. Keep up with the events at ftc.gov/idtheftweek and follow along on social media: #idtheftweek.

Brought to you by Dr. Ware, Microsoft Office 365 Silver Partner, Charleston SC.

CISA Publishes Infographic on Layering Network Security Through Segmentation

This article is contributed. See the original author and article here.

CISA has published an infographic to emphasize the importance of implementing network segmentation—a physical or virtual architectural approach that divides a network into multiple segments, each acting as its own subnetwork, to provide additional security and control that can help prevent or minimize the impact of a cyberattack.

CISA encourages network architects, defenders, and administrators to review the infographic, Layering Network Security Through Segmentation, and implement its recommendations where possible.