Cisco Releases Security Updates for IOS XE SD-WAN Software

This article is contributed. See the original author and article here.

Cisco has released security updates to address a vulnerability in IOS XE SD-WAN Software. An authenticated local attacker could exploit this vulnerability to take control of an affected system. For updates addressing lower severity vulnerabilities, see the Cisco Security Advisories page.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review Cisco Advisory cisco-sa-sd-wan-rhpbE34A and apply the necessary updates.

Google Releases Security Updates for Chrome

This article is contributed. See the original author and article here.

Google has released Chrome version 95.0.4638.54  for Windows, Mac, and Linux. This version addresses vulnerabilities that an attacker could exploit to take control of an affected system.

CISA encourages users and administrators to review the Chrome Release Note and apply the necessary update as soon as possible.

Amazon impersonators: what you need to know

Amazon impersonators: what you need to know

This article was originally posted by the FTC. See the original article here.

Has Amazon contacted you to confirm a recent purchase you didn’t make or to tell you that your account has been hacked? According to the FTC’s new Data Spotlight, since July 2020, about one in three people who have reported a business impersonator scam say the scammer pretended to be Amazon.

These scams can look a few different ways. In one version, scammers offer to “refund” you for an unauthorized purchase but “accidentally transfer” more than promised. They then ask you to send back the difference. What really happens? The scammer moves your own money from one of your bank accounts to the other (like your Savings to Checkings, or vice versa) to make it look like you were refunded. Any money you send back to “Amazon” is your money (not an overpayment) — and as soon as you send it out of your account, it becomes theirs. In another version of the scam, you’re told that hackers have gotten access to your account — and the only way to supposedly protect it is to buy gift cards and share the gift card number and PIN on the back. Once that information is theirs, the money is, too.

Here are some ways to avoid an Amazon impersonator scam:

  • Never call back an unknown number. Use the information on Amazon’s website and not a number listed in an unexpected email or text.
  • Don’t pay for anything with a gift card. Gift cards are for gifts. If anyone asks you to pay with a gift card – or buy gift cards for anything other than a gift, it’s a scam.
  • Don’t give remote access to someone who contacts you unexpectedly. This gives scammers easy access to your personal and financial information—like access to your bank accounts.

Have you spotted this scam? Report it at ReportFraud.ftc.gov.

If you think someone has gotten access to your accounts or personal information, visit IdentityTheft.gov. There, you’ll find steps to take to see if your identity has been misused, and how to report and recover from identity theft.

Brought to you by Dr. Ware, Microsoft Office 365 Silver Partner, Charleston SC.

CISA, FBI, and NSA Release Joint Cybersecurity Advisory on BlackMatter Ransomware

This article is contributed. See the original author and article here.

CISA, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and the National Security Agency (NSA) have released joint Cybersecurity Advisory (CSA): BlackMatter Ransomware.

Since July 2021, malicious cyber actors have used BlackMatter ransomware to target multiple U.S. critical infrastructure entities, including a U.S. Food and Agriculture Sector organization. Using an analyzed sample of BlackMatter ransomware and information from trusted third parties, this CSA provides cyber actor tactics, techniques, and procedures and outlines mitigations to improve ransomware protection, detection, and response.

To reduce the risk of BlackMatter ransomware, CISA, FBI, and NSA encourage organizations to implement the recommended mitigations in the joint CSA and visit StopRansomware.gov for more information on protecting against and responding to ransomware attacks.
 

Amazon impersonators: what you need to know

Keeping older adults safe from scams

This article was originally posted by the FTC. See the original article here.

As today’s annual report to Congress makes clear, the safety of older consumers in the marketplace is a priority for the FTC. Protecting Older Consumers 2020 – 2021: A Report of the Federal Trade Commission summarizes the agency’s ongoing law enforcement efforts, new research results, and extensive outreach aimed at keeping older adults safe from scams including those related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Here are some highlights of the report:

Law enforcement: In the past year, the FTC sued numerous schemes that targeted or had a negative effect on older adults. For example, the FTC charged that:

  • A business marketing stem cell therapy made false claims that its therapy was effective in treating arthritis and joint pain;
  • Sellers of CBD products made claims, without scientific support, about their products’ ability to treat Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, and other serious conditions;
  • Promoters of investment related services falsely claimed they would help people make consistent profits and beat the market.

Research results: An analysis of fraud loss reports filed with the FTC in 2020 shows which scams people 60+ were likely to report losing money to — when compared with adults aged 20 to 59. These include tech support scams, prize, lottery or sweepstakes scams, and friend or family imposter scams. And, significantly, older adults reported losing about $139 million to romance scams in 2020 — the scam category with the highest total reported loss — which is a sharp increase from $84 million in 2019.

Outreach efforts: The FTC aimed to protect older adults from scams by, among other things, sharing our Pass It On campaign materials and issuing Consumer Alerts. Taken together, this outreach has covered topics of interest to older adults, including government impersonator scams, COVID-19 vaccine scams, online safety, and family emergency and mystery shopper scams. In the past year, the FTC engaged in hundreds of public outreach events, meetings, webinars, and other gatherings to help older adults avoid, spot, and report scams.

If a scam affects you, your loved ones, or people in your community, please tell the Federal Trade Commission at ReportFraud.ftc.gov. Your reports help us understand what’s happening in your community.

Brought to you by Dr. Ware, Microsoft Office 365 Silver Partner, Charleston SC.

This week the focus is on charity scams

This week the focus is on charity scams

This article was originally posted by the FTC. See the original article here.

Every year, charity regulators from around the word get together to raise awareness about charity fraud. The FTC joins this effort again this year because it’s so important to know how to spot a charity scam. The more you know, the less likely you’ll donate to a bogus charity. Better yet, you’ll make sure your money is helping in the way you intended.

Follow us on Facebook and on Twitter at #StopCharityFraud to get the latest advice on how to avoid charity scams. This year, we’re focusing on:

You can help people make sure their donations reach real charities, not scammers. This week, join in to raise awareness in your community about charity scams:

  • Share our videos on social media
  • Follow us at Facebook.com/FederalTradeCommission and at Twitter.com/FTC
  • Create your own social media posts using ideas from ftc.gov/charity. Don’t forget to tag @FTC and use #StopCharityFraud
  • Report charity scams at ReportFraud.ftc.gov

Brought to you by Dr. Ware, Microsoft Office 365 Silver Partner, Charleston SC.